Child Welfare for Addiction Professionals

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UNDERSTANDING CHILD WELFARE:
A GUIDE FOR ADDICTION PROFESSIONALS

Why Should I Take This Course?

Children of addicted parents have an increased likelihood of experiencing child abuse and neglect. Many addiction treatment clients struggle to provide a safe and nurturing home environment for their children. When they can't, they may become involved with the child welfare system—or become at risk for involvement.

Addiction professionals need training about child welfare—what it is, how it works, and how it can both support and negatively affect treatment. They need skills to promote critical, positive changes in the lives of their client-parents and clients' children. They should learn that they are required by law to report suspicions of child abuse and neglect to appropriate authorities.

Addiction professionals should learn about the specific child welfare requirements and the tremendous stress that these requirements place on clients while in treatment. Addiction professionals should learn how to develop treatment strategies that support a parent who is seeking to achieve the desired child welfare outcome but is vulnerable to failure.

This course seeks to provide addiction treatment professionals with information, strategies, and tools for working with clients who are also involved in the child welfare system. This course will help clinicians to (1) identify and understand your State's definitions of child abuse, neglect, and related issues; (2) identify and understand your State's requirements regarding child welfare; (3) support addiction treatment clients who are involved in the child welfare system; and (4) track clients' progress through the child welfare system.

Why should I care about child welfare issues?

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Developed by Danya International and the Danya Institute with funding from the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment.

Last updated: August 31, 2002.